Collaborators


Res Altwegg

Res Altwegg

SEEC - Statistics in Ecology, the Environment and Conservation, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Research Interest: Acoustic Application of Spatially Explicit Recapture Recapture to monitor threatened frogs

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David Borchers

David Borchers

School of Mathematics and Statistics: The Observatory, Buchanan Gardens, University of St Andrews, Scotland

Research Interest: Acoustic Application of Spatially Explicit Recapture Recapture to monitor threatened frogs

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Sarah Davies

Sarah Davies

DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology: Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Research Interest: Invasive amphibians in southern Africa

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Ben Evans

Ben Evans

Biology Department, McMaster University, Canada

Research Interest: genome evolution, speciation, and biodiversity especially of African clawed frogs: Xenopus.

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Anthony Herrel

Anthony Herrel

Museum National D'Histoire Naturelle, Département d'Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, France

Research Interest: Evolution of complex systems: performance and morphology of a wide range of African reptiles and amphibians

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Thalassa Matthews

Thalassa Matthews

Iziko Museums of Southern Africa, Cape Town, South Africa

Research Interests: Fossil anurans as palaeoclimatic proxies on the West coast of South Africa


Krystal Tolley

Krystal Tolley

South African National Biodiversity Institute: South Africa

Research Interests: Reptile Speciation Project - Answering higher questions on the nature of the evolutionary history of reptiles, and understanding speciation in southern Africa through a novel approach to taxonomy synergizing morphology, genetics and performance data

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James Vonesh

James Vonesh

Department of Biology: Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

Research Interest: Disentangling the importance of body size and developmental stage in shaping predator-prey interactions. The goal of this research is to use the model organism Xenopus laevis in its native southern Africa to disentangle the relative importance of size and developmental stage in interactions with its predators.

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And lots, lots more...

Not fogetting that there are actually large numbers of collaborators not listed above. Their names are below: